Shu Ren International School
Berkeley, CA
Mandarin-English Immersion
Pre-K to 8th Grade
An IB World School
Berkeley, CA
Shu Ren International School
Berkeley, CA
info@shurenschool.org
510-841-8899
Mandarin-English Immersion
Pre-K to 8th Grade
An IB World School
Berkeley, CA
Shu Ren International School
Berkeley, CA
Mandarin-English Immersion
Pre-K to 8th Grade
An IB World School
Berkeley, CA

New blog about bilingualism

A blog from Psychology Today targets people who use two or more languages in their daily lives. It is written by François Grosjean, Emeritus Professor of psycholinguistics at the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland. Excerpts from Prof. Grosjean’s recent book, Bilingual: Life and Reality, can be found on the Multilingual Living...

New magazine for parents of global citizens

InCulture Magazine, a new online publication run out of Berkeley, targets multilingual and multiracial families and calls itself, “A Magazine for Parents of Little Global Citizens.” It is full of blog posts, essays and other resources offering various perspectives on raising children who speak various languages and belong to multiple cultures. Check it out here. They also have an active Facebook...

Videos on Bilingualism and Immersion Education

The filmmakers who made Speaking in Tongues have posted several video clips focusing on various aspects of becoming bilingual and immersion classrooms. In addition to one about Language and the Brain that we posted earlier, additional clips are now available here and worth watching. Below is the clip and bilingualism and global citizenship: Global Citizenship from PatchWorks Films on...

America’s Chinese Problem

Despite recent media reports about the sudden popularity of studying Mandarin in U.S. schools, a recent Newsweek piece says that American students are still lagging behind their global counterparts in learning Chinese and languages in general. From the article: The comparison between Spanish and Chinese is worth fleshing out, because I suspect both parents and students find the former much less daunting than the latter. Who wouldn’t be put off by all those mind-numbing characters and fast pace of speech? But counterintuitively, Mandarin is easier than Spanish in many ways: there is no need to conjugate verbs, match gender or number, nor worry about tenses. What is much tougher, however, is the sheer number of characters you have to memorize and the mastery of tones (depending on the inflection, the word ji could mean chicken or to remember). Since memorization, particularly when it comes to language acquisition, is a skill that gradually diminishes with age, it’s all the more important for kids to pick up Mandarin from a young age. Yet there is no culture of teaching language to primary-school students in the U.S., at least outside progressive private schools on the coasts. While students in Europe are learning a second, third, or even fourth language in elementary school, our own are still laboring over cursive. Only 15 percent of elementary schools and 58 percent of middle schools offer any foreign languages, according to the Center for Applied Linguistics. It’s time to come to terms with globalization. The need to train a culturally savvy workforce is something other countries understand much better. The Chinese government estimates that some 40...