Shu Ren International School
Berkeley, CA
Mandarin-English Immersion
Pre-K to 8th Grade
An IB World School
Berkeley, CA
Shu Ren International School
Berkeley, CA
info@shurenschool.org
510-841-8899
Mandarin-English Immersion
Pre-K to 8th Grade
An IB World School
Berkeley, CA
Shu Ren International School
Berkeley, CA
Mandarin-English Immersion
Pre-K to 8th Grade
An IB World School
Berkeley, CA

Speaking in Tongues film screening and discussion

On February 27 from 4-6 pm, Shu Ren will host a free screening of the documentary film Speaking in Tongues, followed by an informal discussion of the benefits and challenges of immersion education. Speaking in Tongues is an award-winning film that follows four students in Spanish and Chinese immersion classrooms in San Francisco. Learn more about the film on their website, and a trailer can be viewed below. The film will be shown with Chinese subtitles. The discussion will feature Stella Kwoh, academic director for the National Center for K-16 Chinese Language Pedagogy at U.C. Berkeley, as well as Jie Moore, Shu Ren’s Head of School, and two Shu Ren parents who will discuss their family’s experiences in an immersion classroom. We welcome you to join us for this wonderful opportunity. As we have limited seating capacity, RSVPs are required (register to attend here). This event is for adults and children over 10 only. Light refreshments will be...

双向语言沉浸式教育 Two-way Language Immersion

At Shu Ren, we employ a Two-Way Language Immersion model in our classes, which aims to make students bilingual and biliterate in both English and Chinese. San Francisco First 5 Chinese-language newsletter discusses the two-way immersion model and offers resources for Chinese immersion education. Download the newsletter,...

Beyond Linguistic Proficiency

An article and video on the Asia Society website urges us to broaden our view of language learning by children and to encourage students to become “ambassadors” with “the ability to understand differences, and the capacity and creativity to find common ground”: For Chinese language education, we are familiar with the immediate and obvious yardstick: can a student after, say, five years of study, reach certain test scores, have a conversation with a native, or read a job ad in Chinese. To this end, we ask our students to recite vocabulary, “internalize” grammar points, and maybe even get frustrated over tones, measure words, and pronunciation! Don’t get me wrong – all these are essential building blocks of language learning. For English natives in particular, discipline and diligence are necessary for achieving any meaningful proficiency in Chinese. But, let us practice the abovementioned counter-intuition: stand back from the train that leads a nation of Americans, who can strike deals and negotiate peace in fluent Chinese, and consider the broader context of language education. Think about math and physics education beyond the basics—do we expect all of our students to be mathematicians and physicists? Not necessarily. We want them to understand and be able to apply the scientific method—to think like scientists and mathematicians and develop their habits of mind. In addition to being able to produce target language based on rules given to learners, our students should be guided to discover linguistic patterns by observing, analyzing, hypothesizing, validating, and then applying their observations, experiences, and intuitions. This is what makes language learning much more exciting and stimulating—just what we would...